About Us

About Us

Techniques

Chiropractic adjusting is an art, and as such it has developed in many different ways over the years. Currently there are at least 150 different named techniques being actively taught. Learning a chiropractic technique involves learning both the subluxation analysis (how to locate the subluxations that need to be adjusted) and the corrective technique for adjusting them. Since all chiropractic techniques have the intention of correcting subluxations and reducing stress on the nervous system, when I learn a new technique, it adds to my knowledge and skill rather than contradicting or replacing skills and knowledge I already have. Having so many different techniques to adjust people is a real benefit for the public and chiropractors.

Why did I choose my particular set of techniques? I know that the nervous system is very sensitive and responsive. The pressure from the weight of a dime can cause significant change in the function of a nerve root. Knowing this, I have a profound respect for the effect an adjustment can have on a person's health and well being. Consequently, I have chosen to practice techniques that use a small amount of very specific force.

This is the list of chiropractic techniques that I use in my office. In my office, they are blended together and form a coherent approach to patient care.

Directional Non Force Technique - DNFT was developed by Richard Van Rumpt about 50 years ago. The most important aspect used in my office is his adjusting method which is a very quick thrust with my thumbs. (Using chiropractic terminology, it is called a thumb toggle.) To receive this adjustment, the patient just lies quietly on their stomach. The vertebra being adjusted and the direction it is being adjusted is controlled by where I contact the spine and the direction I apply the thrust. Because this method does not involve getting the patient into a specific physical position, (other than lying on their stomach) the patient is very relaxed when they get adjusted. (I have had young children who were carried into the office asleep, remain asleep through their adjustments.)

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Torque Release Technique - TRT was developed by Jay Holder, and utilizes an instrument to correct the subluxations. The instrument is the most sophisticated of its kind in the profession, however, for most adjustments, I still prefer to use my hands. The instrument adds torque to the force of the adjustment, and that can be very useful in obtaining an effective correction. Also, the TRT spinal analysis is what I use the most in my office.

Sacro Occipital Technique - SOT was developed by Major Bertrand DeJarnette, and it focuses on the alignment of the pelvis, the cranium, and tension created by subluxations of the vertebra. In my office, I use the pelvic blocking techniques and the cranial adjusting techniques that Dr. DeJarnette developed.

Network Spinal Analysis - Developed by Donald Epstein, and Bio Geometric Integration - Developed by Sue Brown, (along with SOT) place emphasis in their analysis on the function of the meninges. (The meninges are a ligament like sheath that surrounds the brain and spinal cord, extending out to the nerve roots. There are 3 layers, the inner layer lines the brain and spinal cord, the outer layer attaches to the skull, 2-3 vertebra in the neck, the sacrum, and the coccyx.) Both techniques use light force or sustained contact to correct subluxations. This is the group of techniques I currently use in my practice. It is very easy to adjust patients using them because they are completely relaxed when they are getting adjusted. Another thing I like about the techniques I use is that I can easily adapt them to whatever circumstance I encounter in a patient. This is especially useful if there is a problem with an extremity, wrists, elbows, shoulders, knees, ankles, etc. Also, they are very safe and the force used to make an adjustment can be widely varied to accommodate all types of patients from athletes to infants to their grandparents.

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